Is CBD Legal? Part II: The FDA

After reading Part I of the Is CBD Legal series, you may be prepared to defend the statement that hemp-derivatives sourced from hemp grown pursuant to a pilot program under the 2018 Farm Bill are perfectly legal at the federal level and that CBD is legal. “Not so fast,” says the United States Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”).

Ritter SpencerIs CBD Legal? Part II: The FDA
Read More

Chelsie Spencer Featured on “Cannabis and Credit Unions: The Opportunities and Risks”

Ritter Spencer Attorney Chelsie Spencer is featured on “Cannabis and Credit Unions: The Opportunities and Risks” podcast with Robert McGarvey, who recently interviewed Ms. Spencer on issues facing credit unions seeking to service cannabis accounts. Mr. McGarvey is an expert in credit union technology and frequently covers issues affecting the credit union industry.

Ritter SpencerChelsie Spencer Featured on “Cannabis and Credit Unions: The Opportunities and Risks”
Read More

Can I Grow Hemp in Texas?

Since implementation of the Agricultural Act of 2018 (“Farm Bill”) on January 1, 2019, we have had several business and individuals in Texas contacting our office regarding growing hemp in Texas. Most want to begin growing hemp on their land in Texas or want to know how to lease their land to a hemp farm in Texas. Unfortunately, hemp growth in Texas remains illegal.

Ritter SpencerCan I Grow Hemp in Texas?
Read More

What Exactly Does the New 2018 Farm Bill Say About Hemp?

We have a 2018 Farm Bill passed in Congress (finally!) The House just passed the vote on the 2018 Farm Bill (“Act”), which includes the full text of the Senate’s Hemp Farming Act of 2018. The Senate passed the Bill yesterday. The President will have ten days after the date on which he receives the enrolled bill to sign or veto the Bill.

Ritter SpencerWhat Exactly Does the New 2018 Farm Bill Say About Hemp?
Read More

Trademark Lawyer Chelsie Spencer Published in Tipsheet: Cannabidiol: The Disjointed Stance on the Cannabinoid at the USPTO

Trademark Lawyer Chelsie Spencer was published in the State Bar of Texas Intellectual Property Section’s TipSheet Vol. 13 No. 2, discussing the USPTO’s treatment of trademark applications for goods containing cannabidiol. To view the article, continue reading below or click here.

Ritter SpencerTrademark Lawyer Chelsie Spencer Published in Tipsheet: Cannabidiol: The Disjointed Stance on the Cannabinoid at the USPTO
Read More

Bankruptcy Law Lacks Remedies for Business Operating in Violation of the Controlled Substances Act

Entrepreneurs start new businesses knowing they are taking certain financial risks. They recognize that their businesses may fail. Entrepreneurs also know that they can likely obtain some value from the sale, reorganization or liquidation of the failed business.  The Bankruptcy Code facilitates the ability of companies to recover the value from the assets and business operations for the benefit of the creditors and equity holders.  In this way, the Bankruptcy Code allows entrepreneurs to engage in risk-taking activities by protecting property rights of individuals and business entities.

Ritter SpencerBankruptcy Law Lacks Remedies for Business Operating in Violation of the Controlled Substances Act
Read More

Trademark Attorney Chelsie Spencer Provides Top Digital Branding Strategy Tip

Ritter Spencer attorney Chelsie Spencer is featured this morning on Fit Small Business. In the article, Top 28 Digital Branding Strategies, Mrs. Spencer advises content creators to ensure that the digital content they place online is legally protected.

Distinguishing your brand in the digital age can be a challenge, particularly due to the easy and instant access of information online and heightened market congestion. Digital theft of intellectual property is quite prevalent in the online age; however, content creators and brand owners can take steps to legally protect their works.

Ritter SpencerTrademark Attorney Chelsie Spencer Provides Top Digital Branding Strategy Tip
Read More

Investments in a Small Business

As a business lawyer, I receive this question from time to time:

“I started a small business and sold investments in it to my friends or family.  Now some of them want their investment back, but we are using the money for the business, and we are still building it up.  They say if they don’t get the money back they will sue.  I am in charge of the company and I am the only one who can run it.  What do I do?”

Ritter SpencerInvestments in a Small Business
Read More