Canna-Brand It? CBD Trademark Registration

Recently, the United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) issued an internal directive which will likely assist pending and future CBD trademark registrations with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. What is CBD you ask? CBD is an acronym for cannabidiol, a cannabis compound derived from the marijuana plant. Importantly, CBD is a non-psychoactive compound, meaning that it lacks THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) – the cannabinoid compound associated with marijuana use. CBD has been added to a variety of goods, from oils, to vapor, to honey, to candies, and beyond.

Ritter SpencerCanna-Brand It? CBD Trademark Registration
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Trademarks 101: Selecting a Trademark Application Filing Basis

When you file an application for federal trademark registration, the TEAS filing portal (Trademark Electronic Application System) will ask you to select a filing basis for your trademark application. There are two available bases for selection: 1(a) or 1(b). Both are derived from the Lanham Act, the statute governing trademarks. When you prepare to file your online trademark application, it can often be confusing as to which basis you should file with.

Ritter SpencerTrademarks 101: Selecting a Trademark Application Filing Basis
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Trademark Registration 101: Should I Register the Trademark for My Business Name or Logo?

When registering a trademark with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), any of the available application forms for filing will require that you specify whether you are applying for the mark in a standard character format, also referred to as a word mark, or in a special form, referred to as a stylized mark or design mark. Assuming that your business name is eligible for trademark registration, you may wonder whether you should trademark the business name or the business’s logo first. You have the option to register (a) the business name only (b) the logo or other design only or (c) both.

Ritter SpencerTrademark Registration 101: Should I Register the Trademark for My Business Name or Logo?
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Infringing Conduct Originating Abroad Which Reaches the United States Can Result in Copyright Liability

If an infringing performance of licensed broadcast media reaches domestic users in the United States, can the foreign originator of the performance be held liable under the United States Copyright Act? The D.C. Circuit has answered that in the affirmative by holding that an infringing performance that originates abroad but terminates in the United States constitutes a domestic Copyright Act violation. Spanski Enterprises, Inc. v. Telewizja Polska, S.A., 17-7051, 2018 WL 1123889 (D.C. Cir. Mar. 2, 2018).

Ritter SpencerInfringing Conduct Originating Abroad Which Reaches the United States Can Result in Copyright Liability
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Holiday Trademark Roundup

It’s time for Ritter Spencer’s first annual holiday trademark round up. During the holidays, you will see several commercials and other advertisement for holiday specific products. Many of the brands behind these advertisements protect their goods and services through federal trademark registration. Even the studios behind some of the famous and classic Christmas movies that you watch have trademarked the goods and services related to their movies and characters. By owning a trademark, trademark owners can exclude others from using a confusingly similar name that may lead to consumer confusion.

Ritter SpencerHoliday Trademark Roundup
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“We’re Gonna Lose Our Circle R (®)!”

The legal and marketing departments behind the Velcro® trademark are attempting to avoid genericide of the mark through consumer education and brand awareness. This week, Velcro Companies released a catchy tune lauding the company’s trademarked brand name and urging consumers to only use VELCRO to refer to actual Velcro products.

Ritter Spencer“We’re Gonna Lose Our Circle R (®)!”
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Trademarks 101: What is Trade Dress?

Continuing with our blog series covering federal trademarks, today we will be discussing trade dress. Trade dress is commonly defined as the total image or overall appearance of a product. Protectable trade dress may include design features such as color or color combinations, graphics, size, shape, and texture, among others. It is the combination of the unique design features which constitute trade dress and make it a protectable trademark.

Ritter SpencerTrademarks 101: What is Trade Dress?
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Jurisdiction in State Law Intellectual Property Cases

Recently, the Dallas Court of Appeals weighed in on a difficult intellectual property issue regarding state law claims: where to sue a person or business that is wrongfully using your intangible property (e.g. trade secrets, trademarks, copyrights, and patents). In legal terms, we call this jurisdiction. A court must have jurisdiction over the claim to adjudicate the case. Normally, jurisdiction is provided by federal statue for copyright claims, trademark claims, and certain trade secret claims. However, the federal statutes require the copyright and trademarks at issue to have been federally registered. Often, if a federal claim is not possible, your lawyer may decide to file in state court.

Ritter SpencerJurisdiction in State Law Intellectual Property Cases
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Trademark Registration 101: What Can I Register?

Trademarks can include any word, name, symbol, device, or any combination thereof used to identify and distinguish goods and services used in interstate commerce. Most people know that trademarks consisting of words and/or graphic designs can be registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. However, non-traditional trademarks, which may include color, sound, texture, smell, taste, texture, etc., are also eligible for trademark registration under the Lanham Act. Non-traditional trademarks also include trade dress, which we will discuss on the blog next week.
Ritter SpencerTrademark Registration 101: What Can I Register?
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Type of Trademarks: Service, Collective & Certification Trademarks

A trademark is a word, phrase, symbol, and/or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods or services of one party from those of others. Where a trademark serves as a source identifier services, you may see it referred to as a service mark. For example, MCDONALDS is used as a trademark for both goods and services. The MCDONALDS service mark covers the brick and mortar retail stores and food services that McDonalds offers to the public. Fun fact: McDonalds once sued a dentist for using the term McDental as a service mark for providing dental services.

Ritter SpencerType of Trademarks: Service, Collective & Certification Trademarks
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