Seven Problems with the DSHS Proposed Rules

Our hemp attorneys recently sat down to identify seven issues with the Texas Department of State Health Services (“DSHS”) Proposed Rules for Texas’ consumable hemp program. If you are a consumable hemp manufacturer, processor, distributor, or retailer, it is not too late to submit your comments directly to DSHS. Comments can be submitted to DSHS until June 7, 2020.

Ritter Spencer, PLLCSeven Problems with the DSHS Proposed Rules
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DSHS Proposed Rules Part II

If you joined us for Parts I through III of this Series, you will know that the Texas Department of State Health Services (“DSHS”) published its proposed rules to govern the Texas consumable hemp program (the “DSHS Proposed Rules”) in the Texas Register on May 8, 2020. The DSHS Proposed Rules are open for public comment for 31 days, meaning the public comment period closes on June 7, 2020. To provide comment on any of the draft rules, you can submit your comments directly to DSHS via email to [email protected]. When emailing comments, you will need to indicate “Comments on Proposed Rule 19R074 Hemp Program” in the subject line. Written comments may also be submitted to Rod Moline, Ph.D., R.S., Section Director, Mail Code 1987, Texas Department of State Health Services, P.O. Box 149347, Austin, Texas 78714-9347. 

Ritter Spencer, PLLCDSHS Proposed Rules Part II
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DSHS Proposed Rules

On June 10, 2019, Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed HB 1325, legislation pertaining to hemp growth and consumable hemp products, into law in the state of Texas. To conform with Texas Health and Safety Code, Chapter 443, as amended by HB 1325, Texas Department of State Health Services (“DSHS”) has published its proposed rules to govern the Texas consumable hemp program (the “DSHS Proposed Rules”) in the Texas Register. Under the DSHS Proposed Rules, a “consumable hemp product” is defined as 

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Coronavirus and Cannabis: Force Majeure Litigation

Rocky, troubling, tumultuous, uncertain, uncharted, unprecedented, and unpredictable times: due to the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, we continue to see these ominous descriptions in coronavirus coverage. Society has had to adapt as this pandemic ravages our way of life. Businesses throughout the world are dealing with the economic fallout COVID-19 has caused, and the cannabis industry is no exception. Numerous cannabis companies, already plagued by financial woes prior to this pandemic, are struggling or are unable to perform contract obligations. A prime example of this is illustrated in the ongoing lawsuit between Kentucky hemp company Third Wave Farms, LLC (“Third Wave”) and Oregon CBD processor Pure Valley Solutions, LLC (“Pure Valley”). Third Wave sued Pure Valley to get out of their contract based on obligations Pure Valley allegedly was unable to meet and based on the force majeure clause of the contract coming into effect.

Ritter Spencer, PLLCCoronavirus and Cannabis: Force Majeure Litigation
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4 Critical Considerations for Cannabis Businesses During COVID-19

The novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has impacted nearly every industry, and the cannabis industry is no exception. As the United States economy continues to experience instability and uncertainty, cannabis companies face increasingly difficult challenges, particularly since the legal cannabis industry remains in flux in most states. Some hemp and cannabis business owners have continued operations as usual, while others have closed their doors completely. It is difficult to navigate the cannabis industry during these stressful and unprecedented times, but cannabis lawyers are able to provide experienced counsel and support as needed. Below, we discuss four critical actions cannabis businesses should consider amidst the COVID-19 threat.

Ritter Spencer, PLLC4 Critical Considerations for Cannabis Businesses During COVID-19
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Marijuana Versus Hemp: Keeping Legalities Straight

As the legalization of cannabis and cannabis-related products continues to make progress, keeping legalities straight can be challenging. The rise of the cannabidiol (CBD) industry has also led to an abundance of misinformation online and in the media, making it harder for the average consumer to find the right answers to their questions. But cannabis, hemp, hemp derivatives, CBD, and marijuana continue to gain popularity, and it is important to fully understand what is legal and what is not. Below, we have put together a comparison between the legalities of marijuana and the legalities of hemp as a thorough examination and differentiation. 

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Revised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part III: Violations, Hemp Transportation, and Hemp Seed Requirements

By: Paul Stevenson

After learning the application and hemp license holder requirements in Part I of this Series and the rules and procedures regarding the sampling and testing of hemp in Part II, it is now time to turn to the TDA plan’s provisions covering violations, license suspension and revocation, hemp transportation, and hemp seed requirements. 

As a hemp license holder, if you violate the TDA plan, it is imperative to comply with any enforcement action or corrective action plan imposed by the TDA in order to avoid any further negative consequences for you and/or your hemp operations.

Ritter Spencer, PLLCRevised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part III: Violations, Hemp Transportation, and Hemp Seed Requirements
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Revised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part II: Sampling & Testing of Hemp

By: Paul Stevenson

Now that you have read Part I of the Revised TDA Hemp Production Plan series on the application and license requirements for hemp producers, it is crucial to understand the rules and methods for the sampling and testing of hemp for tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”) concentration levels. 

Ritter Spencer, PLLCRevised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part II: Sampling & Testing of Hemp
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Revised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part I: License Requirements

By: Paul Stevenson

To conform with the United States Department of Agriculture’s (“USDA”) hemp production plan, the Texas Department of Agriculture (“TDA”) proposed its own hemp production rules and regulations (the “TDA plan”) to the Texas Register in December of 2019. The proposed rules were then revised and released on Friday, January 10th, and they are open to public comment until Monday, February 10th. Comments are to be submitted to Philip Wright, Administrator for Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Texas Department of Agriculture, P.O. Box 12847, Austin, Texas 78711, or by email to [email protected]. If dissatisfied with any provision of the TDA plan, it is highly recommended to raise and send concerns to the TDA during this window for public comment.

Ritter Spencer, PLLCRevised TDA Hemp Production Plan Part I: License Requirements
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Starting a Cannabis Company: Things to Know

The cannabis industry is complex and competitive, but it is also extremely appealing to young entrepreneurs and investors alike as it continues to shift away from negative stigmas and into a more defined regulatory pathway. The rapid growth of the industry attracts cultivators, extractors, retailers, and more, and like many people entering this complicated space, you may feel overwhelmed with where to begin. Whether you’re considering opening a dispensary business, a CBD business, an ancillary cannabis business, or simply obtaining a hemp license, we’ve put together a guide to starting up a cannabis company to further your understanding of the necessary moving parts and details.

Ritter Spencer, PLLCStarting a Cannabis Company: Things to Know
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